Fall Sports in the Heat

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Fall Sports in the Heat

The Cross Country team warms up on the track field with the sun shining.

The Cross Country team warms up on the track field with the sun shining.

Peyton Yamamoto

The Cross Country team warms up on the track field with the sun shining.

Peyton Yamamoto

Peyton Yamamoto

The Cross Country team warms up on the track field with the sun shining.

Kendelle Hung-Ino, Staff Writer

The sweltering summer weather shows no signs of stopping anytime soon. Temperatures have been record-breaking nearly every day, reaching highs in the 90s. Through the heat, Moanalua athletes continue to practice as the fall sports season has begun. Air riflery, cross country, football, softball and soft tennis are all currently practicing outdoors. Unfortunately, practice times fall at typically the hottest points in the day. 

Hawai’is weather reports are frequenting high-temperatures and light trade winds. A combination for muggy conditions. Record breaking temperatures have been occurring since May of 2019, making this summer one of the hottest. The heat index, the “feels like” temperature when humidity levels and air temperature are combined, is forecasted to reach as high as 98-degrees this week. 

Thermometers are set up on the football field to monitor temperatures and determine if any practice adjustments are required. Physical activity in the heat poses health concerns, with dehydration being the major worry amongst coaches and trainers. 

In air riflery, long pants are a requirement for the sport. Many athletes also wear long sleeves to help performance.  “I feel the sweat dripping down my face, making it hard for me to shoot and focus. I sweat out all the water in my body and end up feeling dehydrated,” says sophomore member Ruimin Lin. 

The cross country team is also seen running through the heat. “Practicing in this weather can be pretty unbearable. Especially for a sport like cross country where you’re running the whole time,” cross country captain Peyton Yamamoto says.

The team ensures that their athletes are hydrated while running. “The biggest change we made would be the amount of water breaks we take… Before we’d go run a few miles or finish maybe half the workout before getting water but in this heat, that’s just not possible,” says Yamamoto. “I I just focus on the task at hand and distract myself from the heat,” he adds.

Conditions are forecasted to improve near the end of September, as the fall weather begins. October is predicted to be much more comfortable; with cooler days, windy weather and light showers. 

 

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